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Gut Bacteria and Brains: How the Microbiome Affects Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted: Mon Jun 03, 2019 2:45 pm
by cyrus

Gut Bacteria and Brains: How the Microbiome Affects Alzheimer’s Disease

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Subject EXPERT:

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James M. Ellison, MD, MPH
Dr. Ellison received his medical degree from UCSF in 1978 and trained in psychiatry at the Massachusetts General Hospital (1979-1982).





Swank Memory Care Center, Christiana Care Health System
Microorganisms that live in our gut may influence physical and cognitive health, and possibly even Alzheimer's disease.
Learn how microorganisms that live in our gut may influence physical and cognitive health.

What is a Microbiome?
The next time you feel lonely, consider this fact: Your body is teeming with guests; about a thousand different species of bacteria, fungi, and viruses living on your skin and inside your digestive system. Your colon is “colonized” with some 10 trillion of these critters. Together they contain as many cells as your body and weigh as much as your brain. Together, they are referred to as your “microbiota,” and their collection of genes is called your “microbiome.” Your microbiome, which contains more than a hundred times as many genes as your own DNA, is not something to ignore.

The Microbiome-Health Connection
Researchers are showing that the microorganisms in our gastrointestinal systems affect a surprising number of health conditions including type 2 diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, obesity and food cravings, allergies, inflammatory bowel disease, colorectal cancer, and even Alzheimer’s disease.

Our Modern Lifestyle
Urbanization and our modern dietary habits have changed the composition of our intestinal bacteria, reducing its diversity and promoting the growth of a species, called Bacteriodes, which thrive on our meat-rich diet. Excessive intake of artificial sweeteners and frequent use of antibiotics are two other factors that affect the composition of our microbiota. Unhealthy shifts in the population of intestinal bacteria, unfortunately, can affect the whole body. Researchers have identified multiple ways in which our bacterial inhabitants can affect overall health.

“Leaky” Gut
One might assume that “what happens in the gut stays in the gut,” or at least until it’s properly eliminated. But changes in the microbiota can result in a “leaky gut” that permits the exit of microorganisms and compounds that are a result of their metabolism (metabolites) into our bodies’ circulation. This may have far-reaching effects on the chemistry of our bodies.

Microorganism metabolites, for example, can be a force for good or evil. Some microbial metabolites may be helpful. Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA), for example, is a stress-relieving compound, a sort of natural tranquilizer, that can be infused into our systems as a consequence of bacterial metabolic activity. On the other hand, scientists have found evidence that some unhealthy food cravings are the consequence of bacterial metabolites’ effects on the brain.

Alzheimer’s Disease
With respect to Alzheimer’s disease, the activity of intestinal bacteria may play a significant role. Intestinal flora can produce amyloid which enters the blood circulation and crosses the blood-brain barrier to gain entry into the brain. One of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease is the accumulation of amyloid plaques between nerve cells (neurons) in the brain. Lipopolysaccharides, a component of bacterial cell membranes, can get into the body’s bloodstream and activate inflammatory processes which contribute to the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease. A diet low in antioxidants or high in pro-inflammatory fatty acids can facilitate these microbiotal consequences.

Reducing Risk
How can we use what scientists have learned about the microbiota to reduce our risk of Alzheimer’s disease? One important message is that our microbial inhabitants need us to feed them properly. The same diet that has been shown to reduce Alzheimer’s disease risk, the Mediterranean Diet, has also been found beneficial for our microbiota. A plant-based diet rich in fruit and vegetables and high in fiber changes the composition of our flora, shifting the population away from Bacteroides bacteria and encouraging the growth of health-promoting Prevotella species. These same undesirable Bacteroides species are inhibited by consumption of the polyphenols in green and black tea. Prebiotics (nondigestible substances that can act as food for the gut microbiota) provide additional support for a healthy microbial population. Prebiotic fiber, although indigestible by a human, is a source of food for the microbiota that promotes the growth of healthful microorganisms such as bifidobacterial and lactic acid bacteria.

Summary
When the great poet, Walt Whitman, wrote “I contain multitudes,” he probably was not referring to his intestinal flora! However, each of us does, in fact, serve as home to trillions of organisms that influence our metabolism, immune function, weight, and even cognitive health. The Mediterranean Diet has been shown to reduce the risk for Alzheimer’s disease, and the health of our microbiota may be one of the reasons why this diet is so beneficial. Feed your microbiota lots of fiber, fruit, and vegetables! This is one of the ways in which you can improve your health, reduce systemic inflammation, and even, perhaps, reduce your risk for Alzheimer’s disease.

Resources:

Alzheimer’s Disease Toolkit (Helpful Information to Understand and Manage Alzheimer's Disease)
Expert Information on Alzheimer's Disease (Articles)
Decreasing Your Risk of Alzheimer's Disease (Article)
Can Lifestyle Changes Reduce Your Risk of Dementia? (Article)
Further Reading:

Tremlett H, Bauer KC, Appel-Cresswell S, et al. The gut microbiome in human neurological disease: A review. Ann Neurol 2017;81:369-82.
Pistollato F, Sumalla Cano S, Elio I, et al. Role of gut microbiota and nutrients in amyloid formation and pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease. Nutrition Reviews 2016;74:624-34.
Xu R, Wang Q. Towards understanding brain-gu-microbiome connections in Alzheimer's disease. BMC Systems Biology 2016;10[suppl 3]:277-285.
This content was last updated on: October 2, 2018

This content was first posted on: May 23, 2018
Source: https://www.brightfocus.org/alzheimers/ ... rs-disease

Re: Cancer, Brain Diseases / Disorders & Gut Bacteria Connections to Glyphosate Or Roundup / Toxic Herbicide

Posted: Tue Jun 04, 2019 11:24 pm
by cyrus
Bloomberg Technology & Ideas
Roundup’s Risks Could Go Well Beyond Cancer
Evidence of the cheap herbicide’s danger to biological functions and the environment continues to mount. Why are U.S. regulators not listening?


By Mark Buchanan
June 4, 2019, 8:30 AM PDT
Source: https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/artic ... ns-animals


Glyphosate isn't as safe as its manufacturers would like us to believe, and steep reduction in its use is probably long overdue.

Monsanto patented glyphosate in the early 1970s, and it rapidly became the global go-to chemical for weed control as the commercial product Roundup, which now accounts for more than 70% of pesticide use globally. Executives at Monsanto encouraged the spread of Roundup by engineering genetically modified seeds for corn and other crops that can tolerate glyphosate.

In April, a different study found another worrying effect: Glyphosate might disrupt biological functions for generations. One of the hottest topics in biology in recent years has been epigenetics — the study of how offspring inherit not only the genes of their parents, but also certain patterns of chemical activity written onto those genes by other signaling molecules.

5 pesticides used in US are banned in other countries

Posted: Wed Jun 05, 2019 12:14 am
by cyrus
5 pesticides used in US are banned in other countries
By Rachael Bale / October 23, 2014
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pesticide europe photo
Neonicotinoids, a class of pesticides used widely in the U.S., are thought to be responsible for the mass disappearance of entire bee colonies.

Credit: Owen Humphreys/PA Wire via AP Image
Source: https://www.revealnews.org/article-lega ... countries/
s



As the European Union moves to phase out 22 toxic pesticides, a new study raises the question of what will happen to crops without them. In the United States, growers rely on many pesticides that other countries have banned.

Many farm groups in the U.S. argue that there are no acceptable alternatives to these pesticides – that without them, crop yields would drop. But when it comes to one major crop – soybeans – one controversial pesticide class known as neonicotinoids may actually do nothing to help soy crops, according to a new federal study.

“There are no clear or consistent economic benefits of neonicotinoid seed treatments,” the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study says. Previous studies have shown that in most cases, there isn’t a difference in yield between soybean seeds treated with these pesticides and soybean seeds that didn’t receive any insect control.

In many cases, Europe is far ahead of the United States when it comes to banning certain pesticides. Here are five pesticides allowed in the U.S. but prohibited elsewhere:

1. Neonicotinoids, or “neonics,” are the main suspect in the mysterious mass disappearance of entire bee colonies and work as nerve agents on the bees. In 2013, the European Union voted to ban three of the most common: imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam. Those pesticides, and others in the neonic class, are still used widely in the United States, to much controversy. Despite a 2013 lawsuit from a coalition of activists and beekeepers, the EPA has said it will continue to review evidence of neonics’ effects on bees until 2018.

2. Paraquat, a pesticide linked to Parkinson’s disease, is banned in China and the European Union but not the U.S. It’s highly toxic and kills weeds on contact. A 2009 UCLA study found that a person exposed to paraquat and two other pesticides is three times as likely to develop Parkinson’s disease. Paraquat also can cause kidney damage and difficulty breathing. The EU voted to ban paraquat in 2007, and China approved a ban in 2012. Paraquat is famous for two things: the Drug Enforcement Administration’s spraying of Mexican marijuana fields in the 1970s, and being a leading agent of suicide in Asia and other areas.

3. A volatile and toxic pesticide called 1,3-D (short for 1,3-Dichloropropene) is one of the most heavily used pesticides in California. Also known as Telone, the chemical is actually a gas, or a fumigant in pesticide speak. Growers inject it into the ground to sterilize the soil before planting. But the gas evaporates easily; sometimes, it escapes from beneath its tarp and travels into nearby communities, where it poses a cancer risk to residents. The EU began phasing it out in 2007 because of its risk to humans and animals. There aren’t national numbers for the U.S., but in California, the use of 1,3-D is on the rise.

4. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup, will soon to be banned in the Netherlands. Brazil is considering a ban. Ontario, Canada, banned it for home use as a “cosmetic” pesticide (chemicals that keep your yard looking nice). This year, Sri Lanka banned it. Scientists suspect it may be the culprit in widespread kidney disease among agricultural workers in Sri Lanka, India and Central America. It’s the best-selling herbicide in the world, according to the Ag Journal. And it was the most heavily used pesticide in the U.S. in 2007, according to the most recent numbers available from the EPA.

5. A popular herbicide called atrazine is the pesticide most commonly found in American drinking water. The European Union banned it in 2004 but the EPA re-evaluated and OK’d atrazine use in 2009. While it breaks down quickly in soil, it tends to hang around in water. Almost 90 percent of drinking water in the U.S. has atrazine in it, according to an analysis of U.S. Department of Agriculture data by the Pesticide Action Network. The weed killer messes with hormones, affects the immune system and is linked to birth defects. A New York Times investigation in 2009 found that levels of atrazine in some communities’ drinking water have spiked, sometimes for longer than a month. Residents were not told, mainly because local water authorities didn’t know about the pesticide. Forty-three water authorities that did know sued atrazine’s manufacturer, Syngenta.

This story was edited Robert Salladay and copy edited by Sheela Kamath.
Rachael Bale can be reached at rbale@cironline.org. Follow her on Twitter: @Rachael_Bale.

As the European Union moves to phase out 22 toxic pesticides, a new study raises the question of what will happen to crops without them. In the United States, growers rely on many pesticides that other countries have banned.

Many farm groups in the U.S. argue that there are no acceptable alternatives to these pesticides – that without them, crop yields would drop. But when it comes to one major crop – soybeans – one controversial pesticide class known as neonicotinoids may actually do nothing to help soy crops, according to a new federal study.

“There are no clear or consistent economic benefits of neonicotinoid seed treatments,” the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency study says. Previous studies have shown that in most cases, there isn’t a difference in yield between soybean seeds treated with these pesticides and soybean seeds that didn’t receive any insect control.

In many cases, Europe is far ahead of the United States when it comes to banning certain pesticides. Here are five pesticides allowed in the U.S. but prohibited elsewhere:

1. Neonicotinoids, or “neonics,” are the main suspect in the mysterious mass disappearance of entire bee colonies and work as nerve agents on the bees. In 2013, the European Union voted to ban three of the most common: imidacloprid, clothianidin and thiamethoxam. Those pesticides, and others in the neonic class, are still used widely in the United States, to much controversy. Despite a 2013 lawsuit from a coalition of activists and beekeepers, the EPA has said it will continue to review evidence of neonics’ effects on bees until 2018.

2. Paraquat, a pesticide linked to Parkinson’s disease, is banned in China and the European Union but not the U.S. It’s highly toxic and kills weeds on contact. A 2009 UCLA study found that a person exposed to paraquat and two other pesticides is three times as likely to develop Parkinson’s disease. Paraquat also can cause kidney damage and difficulty breathing. The EU voted to ban paraquat in 2007, and China approved a ban in 2012. Paraquat is famous for two things: the Drug Enforcement Administration’s spraying of Mexican marijuana fields in the 1970s, and being a leading agent of suicide in Asia and other areas.

3. A volatile and toxic pesticide called 1,3-D (short for 1,3-Dichloropropene) is one of the most heavily used pesticides in California. Also known as Telone, the chemical is actually a gas, or a fumigant in pesticide speak. Growers inject it into the ground to sterilize the soil before planting. But the gas evaporates easily; sometimes, it escapes from beneath its tarp and travels into nearby communities, where it poses a cancer risk to residents. The EU began phasing it out in 2007 because of its risk to humans and animals. There aren’t national numbers for the U.S., but in California, the use of 1,3-D is on the rise.

4. Glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup, will soon to be banned in the Netherlands. Brazil is considering a ban. Ontario, Canada, banned it for home use as a “cosmetic” pesticide (chemicals that keep your yard looking nice). This year, Sri Lanka banned it. Scientists suspect it may be the culprit in widespread kidney disease among agricultural workers in Sri Lanka, India and Central America. It’s the best-selling herbicide in the world, according to the Ag Journal. And it was the most heavily used pesticide in the U.S. in 2007, according to the most recent numbers available from the EPA.

5. A popular herbicide called atrazine is the pesticide most commonly found in American drinking water. The European Union banned it in 2004 but the EPA re-evaluated and OK’d atrazine use in 2009. While it breaks down quickly in soil, it tends to hang around in water. Almost 90 percent of drinking water in the U.S. has atrazine in it, according to an analysis of U.S. Department of Agriculture data by the Pesticide Action Network. The weed killer messes with hormones, affects the immune system and is linked to birth defects. A New York Times investigation in 2009 found that levels of atrazine in some communities’ drinking water have spiked, sometimes for longer than a month. Residents were not told, mainly because local water authorities didn’t know about the pesticide. Forty-three water authorities that did know sued atrazine’s manufacturer, Syngenta.

12 Common Food Additives — Should You Avoid Them?

Posted: Wed Jun 05, 2019 1:01 am
by cyrus
12 Common Food Additives — Should You Avoid Them?
Take a look at the ingredients label of just about any food in your kitchen pantry and there’s a good chance you’ll spot a food additive.

They are used to enhance the flavor, appearance or texture of a product, or to extend its shelf life.

Some of these substances have been associated with adverse health effects and should be avoided, while others are safe and can be consumed with minimal risk.

Here are 12 of the most common food additives, plus recommendations for which ones to keep out of your diet.

1. Monosodium Glutamate (MSG)
Monosodium glutamate, or MSG, is a common food additive used to intensify and enhance the flavor of savory dishes.

It’s found in a variety of processed foods like frozen dinners, salty snacks and canned soups. It’s also often added to foods at restaurants and fast food places.

MSG has been a subject of heated controversy since a 1969 study of mice found that large amounts caused harmful neurological effects and impaired growth and development (1Trusted Source).

However, this additive is likely to have little to no effect on human brain health as it’s unable to cross the blood-brain barrier (2Trusted Source).

MSG consumption has also been associated with weight gain and metabolic syndrome in some observational studies, although other research has found no association (3Trusted Source, 4Trusted Source, 5Trusted Source).

That being said, some people do have a sensitivity to MSG and may experience symptoms like headaches, sweating and numbness after eating a large amount.

In one study, 61 people who reported being MSG-sensitive were given either 5 grams of MSG or a placebo.

Interestingly, 36% experienced an adverse reaction to MSG while only 25% reported a reaction to the placebo, so MSG sensitivity may be a legitimate concern for some people (6Trusted Source).

If you experience any negative side effects after consuming MSG, it’s best to keep it out of your diet.

Otherwise, if you’re able to tolerate MSG, it can be safely consumed in moderation without the risk of adverse side effects.

SUMMARY
MSG is used to enhance the flavor of many processed foods. Some people may have a sensitivity to MSG, but it’s safe for most people when used in moderation.
2. Artificial Food Coloring
Artificial food coloring is used to brighten and improve the appearance of everything from candies to condiments.

In recent years, though, there have been many concerns about potential health effects. Specific food dyes like Blue 1, Red 40, Yellow 5 and Yellow 6 have been associated with allergic reactions in some people (7Trusted Source).

Additionally, one review reported that artificial food coloring may promote hyperactivity in children, although another study showed that some children may be more sensitive than others (8Trusted Source, 9Trusted Source).

Concerns have also been raised about the potential cancer-causing effects of certain food dyes.

Red 3, also known as erythrosine, has been shown to increase the risk of thyroid tumors in some animal studies, causing it to be replaced by Red 40 in most foods (10Trusted Source, 11Trusted Source).

However, multiple animal studies have found that other food dyes are not associated with any cancer-causing effects (12Trusted Source, 13Trusted Source).

Still, more research is needed to evaluate the safety and potential health effects of artificial food coloring for humans.

Regardless, food dyes are found primarily in processed foods, which should be limited in a healthy diet. Always opt for whole foods, which are higher in important nutrients and naturally free of artificial food coloring.

SUMMARY
Artificial food coloring may promote hyperactivity in sensitive children and can cause allergic reactions. Red 3 has also been shown to increase the risk of thyroid tumors in animal studies.

3. Sodium Nitrite
Frequently found in processed meats, sodium nitrite acts as a preservative to prevent the growth of bacteria while also adding a salty flavor and reddish-pink color.

When exposed to high heat and in the presence of amino acids, nitrites can turn into nitrosamine, a compound that can have many negative effects on health.

One review showed that a higher intake of nitrites and nitrosamine was associated with a higher risk of stomach cancer (14Trusted Source).

Many other studies have found a similar association, reporting that a higher intake of processed meats may be linked to a higher risk of colorectal, breast and bladder cancer (15Trusted Source, 16Trusted Source, 17Trusted Source).

Other studies suggest that nitrosamine exposure may also be linked to a higher incidence of type 1 diabetes, although findings are inconsistent (18Trusted Source).

Still, it’s best to keep your intake of sodium nitrite and processed meats to a minimum. Try swapping out processed meats like bacon, sausage, hot dogs and ham for unprocessed meat and healthy sources of protein.

Chicken, beef, fish, pork, legumes, nuts, eggs and tempeh are just a few delicious high-protein foods that you can add to your diet in place of processed meats.

SUMMARY
Sodium nitrite is a common ingredient in processed meats that can be converted into a harmful compound called nitrosamine. A higher intake of nitrites and processed meats may be linked to a higher risk of several types of cancer.
4. Guar Gum
Guar gum is a long-chain carbohydrate used to thicken and bind foods. It’s widely used in the food industry and can be found in ice cream, salad dressings, sauces and soups.

Guar gum is high in fiber and has been associated with a multitude of health benefits. For example, one study showed that it reduced symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome such as bloating and constipation (19Trusted Source).

A review of three studies also found that people who took guar gum along with a meal had increased feelings of fullness and ate fewer calories from snacking throughout the day (20Trusted Source).

Other research suggests that guar gum may also help lower levels of blood sugar and cholesterol (21Trusted Source, 22Trusted Source).

However, high amounts of guar gum may have adverse effects on health.

This is because it can swell 10 to 20 times its size, potentially causing issues like obstruction of the esophagus or small intestine (23Trusted Source).

Guar gum may also cause mild symptoms like gas, bloating or cramps in some people (24Trusted Source).

Nevertheless, guar gum is generally considered safe in moderation.

Additionally, the FDA has set strict guidelines on how much guar gum can be added to foods to minimize the risk of negative side effects (25).

SUMMARY
Guar gum is a long-chain carbohydrate used to thicken and bind foods. It has been associated with better digestive health, lower levels of blood sugar and cholesterol, as well as increased feelings of fullness.

5. High-Fructose Corn Syrup
High-fructose corn syrup is a sweetener made from corn. It’s frequently found in soda, juice, candy, breakfast cereals and snack foods.

It’s rich in a type of simple sugar called fructose, which can cause serious health issues when consumed in high amounts.

In particular, high-fructose corn syrup has been linked to weight gain and diabetes.

In one study, 32 people consumed a drink sweetened with either glucose or fructose for 10 weeks.

By the end of the study, the fructose-sweetened beverage caused significant increases in belly fat and blood sugar levels, plus decreased insulin sensitivity compared to the glucose-sweetened beverage (26Trusted Source).

Test-tube and animal studies have also found that fructose can trigger inflammation in the cells (27Trusted Source, 28Trusted Source).

Inflammation is believed to play a central role in many chronic conditions, including heart disease, cancer and diabetes (29Trusted Source).

Additionally, high-fructose corn syrup contributes empty calories and added sugar to foods without any of the important vitamins and minerals that your body needs.

It’s best to skip sugary snacks and foods that contain high-fructose corn syrup.

Instead, go for whole, unprocessed foods without added sugar, and sweeten them up with Stevia, yacon syrup or fresh fruit.

SUMMARY
High-fructose corn syrup is associated with weight gain, diabetes and inflammation. It’s also high in empty calories and contributes nothing but calories to your diet.

6. Artificial Sweeteners
Artificial sweeteners are used in many diet foods and beverages to enhance sweetness while reducing calorie content.

Common types of artificial sweeteners include aspartame, sucralose, saccharin and acesulfame potassium.

Studies show that artificial sweeteners can aid in weight loss and help manage blood sugar levels.

One study found that people who consumed a supplement containing artificial sweeteners for 10 weeks had a lower intake of calories and gained less body fat and weight than those consuming regular sugar (30Trusted Source).

Another study showed that consuming sucralose for three months had no effect on blood sugar control in 128 people with diabetes (31Trusted Source).

Note that certain types of artificial sweeteners like aspartame may cause headaches in some people, and studies show that certain individuals may be more sensitive to its effects (32Trusted Source, 33Trusted Source).

Still, artificial sweeteners are generally considered safe for most people when consumed in moderation (34).

However, if you experience any negative side effects after using artificial sweeteners, check ingredients labels carefully and limit your intake.

SUMMARY
Artificial sweeteners may help promote weight loss and blood sugar control. Certain types may cause mild side effects like headaches, but they are generally considered safe in moderation.
7. Carrageenan
Derived from red seaweed, carrageenan acts as a thickener, emulsifier and preservative in many different food products.

Common sources of carrageenan include almond milk, cottage cheese, ice cream, coffee creamers and dairy-free products like vegan cheese.

For decades, there have been concerns about the safety of this common food additive and its potential effects on health.

One animal study showed that exposure to carrageenan increased levels of fasting blood sugar and glucose intolerance, especially when combined with a high-fat diet (35Trusted Source).

Test-tube and animal studies have found that carrageenan triggered inflammation, as well (36Trusted Source, 37Trusted Source).

Carrageenan is also believed to negatively impact digestive health, and may be associated with the formation of intestinal ulcers and growths (38Trusted Source).

One small study found that when people in remission from ulcerative colitis took a supplement containing carrageenan, they experienced an earlier relapse than those who took a placebo (39Trusted Source).

Unfortunately, current research on the effects of carrageenan is still very limited and more studies are needed to understand how it may affect people.

If you do decide to limit your intake of carrageenan, there are plenty of resources online that can help you find brands and products that are carrageenan-free.

SUMMARY
Test-tube and animal studies have found that carrageenan may cause high blood sugar and could cause intestinal ulcers and growths. One study also found that carrageenan contributed to an earlier relapse of ulcerative colitis.
8. Sodium Benzoate
Sodium benzoate is a preservative often added to carbonated drinks and acidic foods like salad dressings, pickles, fruit juices and condiments.

It has been generally recognized as safe by the FDA, but several studies have uncovered potential side effects that should be considered (40).

For example, one study found that combining sodium benzoate with artificial food coloring increased hyperactivity in 3-year-old children (41Trusted Source).

Another study showed that a higher intake of beverages containing sodium benzoate was associated with more symptoms of ADHD in 475 college students (42Trusted Source).

When combined with vitamin C, sodium benzoate can also be converted into a benzene, a compound that may be associated with cancer development (43Trusted Source, 44Trusted Source).

Carbonated beverages contain the highest concentration of benzene, and diet or sugar-free beverages are even more prone to benzene formation (43Trusted Source).

One study analyzing the concentration of benzene in a variety of foods found cola and cole slaw samples with over 100 ppb of benzene, which is over 20 times the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA for drinking water (45Trusted Source).

To minimize your intake of sodium benzoate, check the labels of your food carefully.

Avoid foods that contain ingredients like benzoic acid, benzene or benzoate, especially if combined with a source of vitamin C such as citric acid or ascorbic acid.

SUMMARY
Sodium benzoate may be associated with increased hyperactivity. If combined with vitamin C, it may also form benzene, a compound that may be associated with cancer development.
9. Trans Fat
Trans fats are a type of unsaturated fat that have undergone hydrogenation, which increases shelf life and improves the consistency of products.

It can be found in many types of processed foods like baked goods, margarine, microwave popcorn and biscuits.

A number of potential health risks have been associated with trans fat intake, and the FDA even recently decided to revoke their GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status (46Trusted Source).

In particular, multiple studies have linked a higher intake of trans fats to a higher risk of heart disease (47Trusted Source, 48Trusted Source, 49Trusted Source).

One study found that eating foods high in trans fats increased several markers of inflammation, which is one of the major risk factors for heart disease (50Trusted Source).

Research also shows there may be a connection between trans fats and diabetes.

A large study with 84,941 women even showed that a high intake of trans fat was associated with a 40% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes (51Trusted Source).

Cutting processed foods out of your diet is the easiest and most effective way to decrease your trans fat intake.

You can also make a few simple switches in your diet, like using butter instead of margarine and swapping out vegetable oils for olive oil or coconut oil instead.

SUMMARY
Eating trans fats has been associated with many negative effects on health, including inflammation, heart disease and diabetes.
10. Xanthan Gum
Xanthan gum is a common additive that’s used to thicken and stabilize many types of food such as salad dressings, soups, syrups and sauces.

It’s also sometimes used in gluten-free recipes to help improve the texture of foods.

Xanthan gum has been associated with several health benefits.

One study found that consuming rice with added xanthan gum resulted in lower levels of blood sugar than consuming rice without it (52).

Another study also found that eating xanthan gum for six weeks reduced levels of blood sugar and cholesterol, plus increased feelings of fullness (53Trusted Source).

However, recent research on the potential benefits of xanthan gum is still limited.

Furthermore, consuming large amounts of xanthan gum may also be linked to digestive problems, such as increased stool output, gas and soft stools (54Trusted Source).

For most people, though, xanthan gum is generally safe and well tolerated.

If you do experience negative symptoms after eating xanthan gum, it’s best to reduce your intake or consider eliminating it from your diet.

SUMMARY
Xanthan gum may help reduce levels of blood sugar and cholesterol. In large amounts, it may cause digestive issues like gas and soft stools.
11. Artificial Flavoring
Artificial flavors are chemicals designed to mimic the taste of other ingredients.

They can be used to imitate a variety of different flavors, from popcorn and caramel to fruit and beyond.

Animal studies have found that these synthetic flavors could have some concerning effects on health.

One study found that the red blood cell production in rats was significantly reduced after they were fed artificial flavorings for seven days.

Not only that, certain flavors like chocolate, biscuit and strawberry were also found to have a toxic effect on their bone marrow cells (55Trusted Source).

Similarly, another animal study showed that grape, plum and orange synthetic flavorings inhibited cell division and were toxic to bone marrow cells in mice (56Trusted Source).

However, keep in mind that these studies used a much more concentrated dose than you might find in food, and further research is needed to determine how artificial flavoring in the amounts found in foods may affect humans.

In the meantime, if you want to limit your intake of artificial flavoring, check the ingredients label of your foods.

Look for “chocolate” or “cocoa” on the ingredients label rather than “chocolate flavoring” or “artificial flavoring.”

SUMMARY
Some animal studies have found that artificial flavoring may be toxic to bone marrow cells. More research is needed to evaluate the effects in humans.
12. Yeast Extract
Yeast extract, also called autolyzed yeast extract or hydrolyzed yeast extract, is added to certain savory foods like cheese, soy sauce and salty snacks to boost the flavor.

It’s made by combining sugar and yeast in a warm environment, then spinning it in a centrifuge and discarding the cell walls of the yeast.

Yeast extract contains glutamate, which is a type of naturally occurring amino acid found in many foods.

Much like monosodium glutamate (MSG), eating foods with glutamate may cause mild symptoms like headaches, numbness and swelling in people who are sensitive to its effects. (6Trusted Source).

Additionally, yeast extract is relatively high in sodium, with about 400 milligrams in each teaspoon (8 grams) (57Trusted Source).

Reducing sodium intake has been shown to help decrease blood pressure, especially in people who have high blood pressure (58Trusted Source).

However, most foods only contain a small amount of added yeast extract, so the glutamate and sodium in yeast extract are unlikely to cause much of a problem for most people.

As of 2017, yeast extract is still recognized as safe by the Food and Drug Administration (59).

If you do experience negative effects, consider limiting your intake of processed foods with yeast extract and adding more fresh, whole foods to your diet.

SUMMARY
Yeast extract is high in sodium and contains glutamate, which may trigger symptoms in some people. Yet because only small amounts of yeast extract are added to foods, it’s unlikely to cause problems for most people.
The Bottom Line
While certain food additives have been linked to some pretty scary side effects, there are plenty of others that can be safely consumed as part of a healthy diet.

Start reading the ingredient labels when grocery shopping to take control of your diet and determine what’s really being added to your favorite foods.

Additionally, try cutting back on processed and packaged foods and incorporating more fresh ingredients into your diet to minimize your intake of food additives.

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT: Safe Or Scary? The Shifting Reputation Of Glyphosate, AKA Roundup

Posted: Sun Jun 09, 2019 3:40 pm
by cyrus
FOOD FOR THOUGHT
Safe Or Scary? The Shifting Reputation Of Glyphosate, AKA Roundup
6:25
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TRANSCRIPT
May 30, 20195:00 AM ET
Heard on Morning Edition



On March 20, 2015, IARC announced its conclusion: Glyphosate is "probably carcinogenic to humans."

That conclusion rests on three kinds of studies. First, IARC found "strong evidence" that glyphosate can damage DNA in cells. This kind of damage, inducing mutations, is the first step in causing cancer. Second, there are studies showing that when mice ate glyphosate, they got more tumors. Kate Guyton, a senior toxicologist at IARC, told reporters at a news conference that "these two studies gave sufficient evidence of cancer in animals."


Lawyers for the cancer victims, though, suggested that those same regulators couldn't be trusted because they'd been manipulated or fooled by Monsanto.

Miller and his legal team showed the juries a whole collection of internal Monsanto emails. In one, company executives described phone calls with an official at the EPA. As Miller describes it, the official said, "I don't need to see any more studies. I'm going to declare Roundup safe, and I'm going to stop another agency from looking at it."

Another Monsanto executive discussed ghostwriting papers on glyphosate's safety that scientists could publish under their own names.

"I think the jury was rightfully offended," Miller says.


Source: https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/20 ... ka-roundup


The Pesticides Causing Colony Collapse In Bees And The Chemicals From Fracking

Posted: Fri Jun 14, 2019 2:51 am
by cyrus
Video Clip: The Pesticides Causing Colony Collapse In Bees And The Chemicals From Fracking

Source URL : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvZODBqERXc

The Real Truth About Health
Published on Jan 18, 2018
Do you know what chemicals are in your shampoo? How about your cosmetics? Do you know what’s in the plastic water bottles you drink from, or the weed killer in your garage, or your children’s pajamas? If you’re like most of us, the answer is probably no. But you also probably figured that most of these products were safe, and that someone—the manufacturers, the government—was looking out for you. The truth might surprise you.

After experiencing a health scare of his own, journalist McKay Jenkins set out to discover the truth about toxic chemicals, our alarming levels of exposure, and our government’s utter failure to regulate them effectively. Mckay Jenkins reveals how dangerous, and how common, toxins are in the most ordinary things, and in the most familiar of places.


Connect with The Real Truth About Health
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Passionate believers in whole food plant based diets, no chemicals, minimal pharmaceutical drugs, no GMO's. Fighting to stop climate change and extinction.
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Education

What you need to know about glyphosate, the cancer-linked chemical found in Cheerios

Posted: Fri Jun 14, 2019 6:12 am
by cyrus
What you need to know about glyphosate, the cancer-linked chemical found in Cheerios

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/what-you-n ... -cheerios/


New tests reveal popular cereals and snack foods could have potentially harmful levels of the same chemical found in weed killer.

The chemical is called glyphosate, and some reports say it may cause cancer. Of the 21 General Mills products examined by the Environmental Working Group, the highest levels of glyphosate were found in Honey Nut Cheerios Medley Crunch, which had more than five times what the advocacy group believes is a safe level. Original Cheerios had more than four-and-a-half times what the group considers safe.

The products are considered safe under EPA standards. "CBS This Morning" reached out to the EPA and FDA, but did not hear back.

General Mills said in a statement that "these are very strict rules that we follow, as do farmers who grow crops. We continue to work closely with farmers, our suppliers and conservation organizations to minimize the use of pesticides on the ingredients we use in our foods."

The maker of Roundup weed killer said that the glyphosate levels in the report are "far below the established safety standards."

Dr. David Agus, a cancer specialist, joined "CBS This Morning" Thursday to sort out the claims. He said that "we just don't know" exactly how glyphosate will impact the human body in the long run.

"The problem is when you eat something, say, glyphosate, there's a 10, 20-year lag before disease and the intervention."

Agus explained that glyphosate emerged in the 1960s as a pipe cleaner, and then started being used as a weed killer. But in the 1990s, "usage went through the roof."

When asked if he'd willingly put the chemical in his own body, Agus said that he "certainly wouldn't."

"It can kill bacteria in your G.I. tract, it can disrupt your endocrine system, and there's reasonable data that it can increase risk of lymphoma. So based on all of those, it's probably not good," he said, adding that it can also disrupt our cells and hormone levels.

And he said the chemical is more prevalent in our food than ever. "In the last couple of years, more and more farms across the world are using it to kill all of their crops right before harvest so it's easier to harvest," he said. "So the levels have gone up dramatically in the last decade." Agus added that the urine of most Americans contains glyphosate.

As a result, Agus believes it's important for farmers to seek an alternative — and for society to incentivize other options. "The farmer who doesn't use glyphosate is at a competitive disadvantage to his or her neighbor who does use it. So we have to figure out better and safer ways of doing it."

Agus pointed out that about ten years ago, the FDA raised the level of glyphosate allowed in food. "We have to reexamine this," he said, adding "new things have to be done."

Re: Cancer, Brain Diseases / Disorders & Gut Bacteria Connections to Glyphosate Or Roundup / Toxic Herbicide

Posted: Sun Jun 16, 2019 5:53 pm
by cyrus
The personal stories shared in this film are compelling, truly inspiring and self-empowering for anyone who seeks to heal and regain their health!
DR. MICHELLE GARIARI, ND

Watch Video: Secret Ingredients GMOs - Dr. Tom O'Bryan

Source: https://secretingredientsmovie.com/
The Story
While the debate rages on about GMOs and pesticides, this powerful film by Amy Hart and Jeffrey Smith, shares remarkable stories of people who regain their health after discovering the secret ingredients in their food and making a bold commitment to avoid them.
The secret ingredients in our food may be a lead driver of our obesity, infertility, cancer, digestive problems, autism, brain fog, skin conditions, gluten sensitivity, allergies, fatigue, anxiety, and many other conditions. Meet more than a dozen people whose turned around serious health conditions after adopting a diet that avoids genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and food sprayed with toxic herbicides like Roundup. Learn from leading physicians who say that these are not coincidences. They see illness and recovery like this every day in their practice. And listen to the scientists who explain why.


At the heart of the story is Kathleen DiChiara and her family of five who were collectively struggling with 21 chronic diseases.
They were like many other families – despite living a healthy lifestyle and making a point to exercise and ‘eat right’ – they were constantly struggling with one condition after another. When Kathleen was faced with a severe health crisis, she became determined to figure out what was causing these conditions. Everything changed when she identified the secret ingredients that were keeping them a perpetual state of illness – and eliminated them from their kitchen. The results were dramatic. Kathleen’s experience is not uncommon.



The film shares many other powerful stories of people who regained their health after changing to an all organic diet, free of GMOs, Roundup and other toxic pesticides. Skin and digestive conditions disappear; cancer patients now have a clean bill of health; autistic children are now thriving; infertile couples now have healthy babies. These experiences are backed up by physicians, scientists and experts who explain the science, and the political history, of GMOs and Roundup.

Sign up for valuable tips, tools and strategies to easily and affordably transform your life and health.
Your long term health and well-being is being impacted by harmful poisons that make it from the fields to your table. With simple dietary changes, you will feel better, think more clearly, and improve your chances of a long and healthy life.

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Artfully directed by Amy Hart and leading anti-GMO consumer advocate, Jeffrey Smith, this film is the perfect blend of heartfelt stories and scientific explanations that may inspire you to ask: “What could happen if I remove the secret ingredients from my kitchen?”

Now available worldwide!


Cast & Crew
Jeffrey Smith (Filmmaker & Executive Producer) and Amy Hart (Filmmaker & Creative Director) met at the Heirloom Expo in Santa Rosa, CA – and the first conversation they had was about making a film together about GMOs; this conversation soon led to the creation of Secret Ingredients. Two months later they met Kathleen DiChiara – and her personal journey became the heart of the storyline. They began filming Kathleen and her family on the east coast and traveled around the country to film families and experts from coast to coast. They are deeply grateful for all of the heartfelt stories, as well as the medical and scientific expertise, shared by everyone interviewed. The film came to life with the addition of beautiful animation, motion graphics and original music by a list of talented artists. Thank you to everyone who contributed to the creation of this fil

Power Foods for the Brain | Neal Barnard | TEDxBismarck

Posted: Sun Jun 16, 2019 6:15 pm
by cyrus
Video: Power Foods for the Brain | Neal Barnard | TEDxBismarck


Power Foods for the Brain

Dr. Barnard has led numerous research studies investigating the effects of diet on diabetes, body weight, and chronic pain, including a groundbreaking study of dietary interventions in type 2 diabetes, funded by the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Barnard has authored over 70 scientific publications as well as 17 books. As president of the Physicians Committee, Dr. Barnard leads programs advocating for preventive medicine, good nutrition, and higher ethical standards in research. He has hosted three PBS television programs on nutrition and health and is frequently called on by news programs to discuss issues related to nutrition and research. Originally from Fargo, North Dakota, Dr. Barnard received his M.D. degree at the George Washington University School of Medicine and completed his residency at the same institution. He practiced at St. Vincent’s Hospital in New York before returning to Washington to found the Physicians Committee.

This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at http://ted.com/tedx